HOSA week

HOSA+week

Elizabeth White, Addison Colvin, and Madison Lowe

HOSA week started November 11th-15th. HOSA sold popcorn and drinks to raise money for the Pediatric Cancer Foundation. Throughout the week there were dress up days including: Monday as scrub day, Tuesday as dress like Mrs. Leigh or Mrs Flagg, Wednesday as dress for your occupation, Thursday as wear your HOSA shirt, and Friday as spirit day. Friday we ended HOSA week with a blood drive. 

The HOSA blood drive was a success here at Dyer County High School. There were around 60-80 people that signed up between our students and faculty; approximately 67 donors and 48 pints of blood were donated. LifeLine Blood Services’ bloodmobile is about 40 feet long and takes up 8 parking spaces. On the inside, there are two 6 foot tables and six chairs that are needed for donor registration. To donate, your vital signs must first be evaluated. After they give you the okay that you are in good enough health to give blood, you move inside the bloodmobile to then answer a series of questions in which go into further detail about your health history. If all requirements are met, you will then begin the preparation process for giving the blood. Patients are asked to relax as their legs are elevated assuring that the circulation and blood flow is where it needs to be to prevent passing out. Those giving can expect a wait time of around 15 minutes to successfully donate a pint and the 3 vials that are taken for testing. This is to make sure that the patient is healthy enough so that their blood will be useful for someone in need. In terms of the physical conditions you must weigh 110 pounds and be at least 17 years of age. After you give blood, you get a card in the mail that states your blood type so you will be aware of this for future reference and for the follow up date of 3 months to give again. Sometimes you get in situations that really mean life or death, so next time you let the Lifeline bloodmobile pass you by, consider doing this good deed and don’t skip out on saving a life.